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NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=adrenal tumor
Updated: 14 hours 29 min ago

Retroperitoneal ganglioneuroma mimicking right adrenal mass.

Mon, 12/23/2013 - 15:41
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Retroperitoneal ganglioneuroma mimicking right adrenal mass.

Urology. 2013 Dec;82(6):e41-2

Authors: Nasseh H, Shahab E

Abstract
Ganglioneuroma is a rare benign tumor of the sympathetic nervous system that can arise from the adrenal medulla. Few reports have been published of the surgical resection of this rare tumor using a laparoscopic approach. We present a case of retroperitoneal ganglioneuroma that mimicked an adrenal mass on imaging and was resected laparoscopically.

PMID: 24295269 [PubMed - in process]

D2 dopamine receptor plays a role in the proliferation of adrenal cortical cells.

Mon, 12/23/2013 - 15:41
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D2 dopamine receptor plays a role in the proliferation of adrenal cortical cells.

J Mol Endocrinol. 2013 Nov 29;

Authors: Chang HW, Huang CY, Wu VC, Yang SY, Chu TS, Chen YM, Hsieh BS, Wu KD

Abstract
Aldosterone-producing adenomas (APA) and bilateral adrenal hyperplasia are the two characteristic types of primary aldosteronism. Dysregulation of adrenal cortical cell proliferation contributes to both diseases. We previously demonstrated that APA tissues express less dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) than the respective non-tumor tissue; this contributes to the overproduction of aldosterone. In this study, we demonstrate that D2R plays a role in the regulation of angiotensin II (AII)-stimulated adrenal cortical cell proliferation. The D2R agonist, bromocriptine, inhibited AII-stimulated cell proliferation in primary cultures of the normal human adrenal cortex and APA. D2R activation attenuated AII-induced PKCμ activation; depletion of PKCμ significantly decreased AII-stimulated cyclin D1 protein expression and cell proliferation. D2R activation also inhibited AII-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Because the less D2R level in APA, less inhibiting effect of D2R on AII signaling made the level of phosphorylated ERK1/2 in APA be significantly greater than and the normal adrenal cortex. Our results demonstrate that in addition to inhibiting aldosterone synthesis/production, D2R also exerts an anti-proliferative effect in adrenal cortical and APA cells by attenuating PKCµ and ERK phosphorylation under AII stimulation. Our novel finding suggests a new therapeutic target for primary aldosteronism.

PMID: 24293642 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Expression and Localization of Neuregulin-1 (Nrg1) and ErbB2/ErbB4 Receptors in Main Endocrine Organs of the Rhesus Monkey.

Thu, 12/19/2013 - 09:04

Expression and Localization of Neuregulin-1 (Nrg1) and ErbB2/ErbB4 Receptors in Main Endocrine Organs of the Rhesus Monkey.

Int J Endocrinol Metab. 2013;11(3):162-6

Authors: Zhao WJ

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Although Neuregulin-1 (Nrg1)and its receptors have been indicated at the mRNA level in partial human endocrine organs and its functional roles have been evaluated in vitro, their morphological distribution in higher animals are not fully studied. The present research focused on expression of Nrg1 and its main receptors ErbB2 and ErbB4 in main endocrine organs of the rhesus monkey.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: The morphological expression of Nrg1 and its receptors ErbB2 and ErbB4 as well as their potential co-localization were determined by double immunofluorescence in the pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, pancreas and adrenal gland sample tissues. The expression level of Nrg1 on each sample was indexed by the fold of integrative fluorescence intensity (IFI) relative to that of one cortical tissue.
RESULTS: Differential expression of Nrg1 and their cognate receptors ErbB2 and ErbB4 were found selectively expressed in endocrine organs we tested, with higher expression levels detected in the adrenal gland (AG) and pancreas. Co-localization of Nrg1 with either ErbB2 or ErbB4 was detected in AG, thyroid and parathyroid gland, and Nrg1 was only co-localized with ErbB4 in the islet cells of the pancreas. In the pituitary, adjacent localization of Nrg1 positive cells with ErbB4 positive cells were observed.
CONCLUSIONS: This investigation morphologically profiles the differential expression of Nrg1 and its receptors ErbB2 and ErbB4 in the main endocrine organ structures, suggesting an autocrine or paracrine-directed Nrg1-ErbB signaling pathway in some of these structures.

PMID: 24348587 [PubMed]

Testicular mass with intracerebral lesions: malignancy or infection?

Thu, 12/19/2013 - 09:04
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Testicular mass with intracerebral lesions: malignancy or infection?

BMJ Case Rep. 2013;2013

Authors: Prabhudesai SG, Sarkodieh JE, Mankad K

PMID: 23921689 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Isolated adrenocorticotropin deficiency associated with painless thyroiditis: a case report and review of the literature.

Thu, 12/19/2013 - 09:04
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Isolated adrenocorticotropin deficiency associated with painless thyroiditis: a case report and review of the literature.

Kurume Med J. 2012;59(3-4):71-7

Authors: Mizokami T, Itoh Y, Sato Y, Nunoi K, Okamura K

Abstract
A 53-year-old Japanese man was admitted with a 3-month history of transient headache followed by general fatigue and weight loss. He had a history of ocular myasthenia gravis which had been in remission following thymectomy 30 years ago. He had a small diffuse goiter without tenderness, and was diagnosed as having painless thyroiditis with mild thyrotoxicosis on admission. Endocrinological studies showed he had isolated adrenocorticotropin deficiency. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pituitary gland revealed no abnormalities. His symptoms improved soon after replacement of glucocorticoid. After an episode of hypothyroidism, he spontaneously became euthyroid. It is likely that thyrotoxicosis uncovered adrenal insufficiency that had developed insidiously, and hypoadrenocorticism-induced immunological changes may have triggered the development of painless thyroiditis. Moreover, thymectomy might have facilitated the development of pituitary and thyroid autoimmunity.

PMID: 23823017 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Disseminated avian mycobacteriosis in a free-living grey heron (Ardea cinerea).

Wed, 12/11/2013 - 19:27
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Disseminated avian mycobacteriosis in a free-living grey heron (Ardea cinerea).

Avian Dis. 2013 Sep;57(3):703-6

Authors: Quesada-Canales O, Díaz-Delgado J, Paz Y, Domínguez L, Bezos J, Calabuig P, Suárez-Bonnet A, Fernández A, Andrada M

Abstract
Wild birds share with humans the capacity for moving fast over large distances. During migratory movements, birds carry pathogens that can be transmitted between species. One of these concerning pathogens is Mycobacterium spp. A necropsy was performed in a grey heron (Ardea cinerea) that had been medically treated for a polyarthritic process. Grossly, firm white-yellowish nodules of various size, resembling granulomas, were observed in right carpal joint, both patellar joints, neck musculature, palate, pharynx, larynx, nasal sinuses, pericardial sac, air sacs, proventriculus and intestinal serosa, pancreas, kidneys, adrenal glands, and oviduct. Microscopically, these lesions were composed of multinucleated giant cells, large macrophages, and lymphocytes, with a central zone of necrosis and in some cases with peripheral fibrosis. Acid-fast bacilli were detected within these lesions. Lesions were cultured and Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium was identified. To the best of our knowledge this is the first description of mycobacteriosis in grey herons. Although the grey heron is currently considered a least-concern species, avian mycobacteriosis remains a threat on the conservation management of endangered avian species, and constitutes a public health concern as well.

PMID: 24283143 [PubMed - in process]

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